Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘The Mimi Project’ Category

It is our 2012 New Year’s resolution to resurrect the blog!

Let me catch you up: I moved to Denver and got married (no biggie).  Jenny moved across the country and got a new job (as did her hubby).  So, between those life changing events and a family emergency or two, we were busy little bees this year! But enough excuses – let’s talk about the thing that is so near and dear to everyone’s heart – food.

We last left you with a post about the 1st Annual Drogue Holiday party.  I am proud to report that our 2nd annual Drogue Holiday party was also a success.  And since we left you last year at Christmas time, it’s fitting that we pick up where we left off – at New Year’s.

Every New Year’s day, Mimi opened her home to anyone who was interested in some simple “good luck” black eyed peas.  According to my Mary Mac’s Tea Room cookbook (thanks, Dad!,) this Southern tradition dates back to the Civil War.   Apparently Union troops would strip the land of all stored food and destroy whatever they couldn’t carry with them.  The  Northern soldiers didn’t consider “field peas” a suitable source of food.  So these “field peas” became known for good luck!

Seasoned with salt pork and hog jowls or pork hocks, Mimi served her peas over white rice, and topped them with stewed tomatoes.  The goal is to eat at least 12 peas (one for luck during each month in the year).  Happily, this goal isn’t hard to attain.  Mimi also served her famous cornbread as a sopping accessory (with jalapeno or strawberry jam) as well as fresh scallions to gnaw on/freshen your breath.

So this year, we will carry on the tradition.

 

Black-Eyed Peas
Adapted From Mary Mac’s Tea Room

1 small smoked ham hock
5 ounces of fatback (salt pork)
1 small yellow onion, diced
4 cups dried black-eyed peas
1/2 teaspoon of white pepper

Bring a stockpot two-thirds full with water to a boil over medium-high heat.  Add the ham hock, fatback, and onion and return to a rolling boil.  Add the black-eyed peas and let cook, uncovered for approximately 1 hour, or until the black-eyed peas are tender.  Add salt and pepper if desired.  Serve with slotted spoon over white rice, and top with stewed tomatoes.  See below for recipe.

Mom and I have debated about whether Mimi used canned tomatoes or whether she blanched tomatoes and stewed them fresh.  I can specifically remember Mimi teaching me to blanch tomatoes. I can’t imagine why she would have been doing that except for a recipe that called for stewed tomatoes.  We came to the conclusion that Mimi used canned tomatoes (sometimes her own and sometimes store-bought) just because it would be tough to find good tomatoes in December.  So, the choice is yours.

In case you need a quick 101 on blanching: bring some water to a boil, add the tomatoes for a minute or 2, remove and immediately submerge in cold water.  This makes the tomatoes really easy to peel, core, and seed.

Dried black eyed peas

Salt pork and pork hock

 

Stewed Tomatoes
2-3 cans of diced tomatoes, or 8-10 whole tomatoes, blanched and diced
1 onion – diced
Dash of white vinegar
A few pinches of sugar
1/2 stick of butter
tomato paste (optional)

Cook the diced onions in butter for quite some time.  You want the onions to begin to brown so that they take on that really sweet buttery flavor.  Add the tomatoes and stew for a while.  You may want to add a spoonful of tomato paste depending on the thickness.  Add vinegar and sugar to taste.  The tomatoes should take on a tangy taste.  Stew for 30-40 minutes.  This can be done ahead of time.

Happy 2012!

Happy 2012!!!

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

About a year ago, I mused about my favorite foods from growing up in the South – and specifically those recipes prepared by my (and Rachael’s) grandmother, Mimi.  There were recipes from our Granddaddy, Great Uncle Doe, and Great Aunt NoNo, too.  (All of these people have “normal” names, by the way – respectively, they are Mary Lea and Tom Humphress and Gordon and Lynnora Wheeler, if you were curious.)  When Rachael and I started The Mimi Project, Mimi was still with us.  She died last Christmas, but the Mimi Project has continued with her passing – and I’d argue that our urge to revisit these foods and their associated memories has grown even stronger.

Mimi and Granddaddy, aka Mary Lea and Tom Humphress

Our original list of Mimi Project recipes included the following:

  • Mimi’s Birthday Cake
  • Mimi’s Ice-box Cookies
  • NoNo’s Divinity
  • Mimi’s Cornbread Sticks
  • Mimi’s Chicken and Dumplings
  • Mimi’s Cornbread Stuffing with Giblet Gravy
  • Mimi’s Chicken Salad
  • Mimi’s Black Bean Soup
  • Mimi’s Vegetable Soup
  • Mimi’s Crab Dip
  • Granddaddy’s Pepper Vinegar
  • Mimi’s Cake with Lemon Cheese (Nick’s birthday cake)
  • Mimi’s Macaroni and Cheese
  • Mimi’s Home-Grown-and-Canned Green Bean Salad with Purple Onion and Italian Dressing
  • Granddaddy’s Cheese Crackers
  • Granddaddy’s Pecans
  • Granddaddy’s Chicken with Lemon, Butter and Worcestershire
  • Mimi’s Pimiento Cheese
  • NoNo’s Blackberry (or Quince or Grape) Jelly
  • Doe’s Fried Eggplant
  • Doe’s (and Grandmother Wheeler’s) Thin Cornbread

We’ve tackled the recipes in bold, and I’ve linked to those we’ve actually written up here on the blog.  Those that haven’t been blogged will be – we’re just perfecting the technique, or waiting to take nice photos.  Of course it stands to reason that the list of recipes would grow – especially once Rachael and I inherited Mimi’s coveted recipe box.  Here are some that we’ve enjoyed that weren’t on the original list:

What else would I add now that time has passed?  I’d like to see some of Mimi’s “congealed salads” – as she called them – on the list.  I know many people think of the bad old days of neon-colored Jell-o, studded with unidentifiable floating chunks, left uneaten on the cafeteria line.  But having had a sort of “gazpacho essence” aspic prepared by Anne Quatrano, one of Atlanta’s premier chefs, at a local farmer’s market one hot morning, I think there is hope for congealed salads.  I remember cucumbers and cottage cheese in one of Mimi’s many versions, and grapefruit and nuts in another – I think I can make Jell-o worth your while.  Really!

Here’s something fun that reminded me of eating at Mimi’s house, too – a “recipe” for Crisp Caramelized Doughnuts.  Mimi would buy a box of Krispy Kremes and re-heat them in the microwave for 10 seconds.  They became other-worldly with their crisped coating of sugar glaze and warm, collapsing dough… but caramelizing them over a flame?  That’s the slightly grown-up version of this childhood treat.

Read Full Post »

Making use of your food

This is no novelty, but I really like the idea of using as much of your food as possible, whether it’s using beet greens for a salad or saving the fat from a pork shoulder to cook your winter greens.  In Florida, we have the sort of climate that allows for plentiful and delicious tomatoes.  As a result, we don’t mind using our tomatoes in things other than salads or marinara sauce.   In fact, we use tomatoes before they ripen – aka when they are still green.  This is not to be confused with varieties of tomatoes that are actually bred to be green.  When I say green tomatoes, I mean un-ripened tomatoes.  There is a difference.

Of course, there is the ever popular fried green tomato (FGT, not to be confused with the movie – it’s a great one if you haven’t seen it.) I eat FGTs plain or with a little goat cheese schmeared on top.  Actually, I have dreamt of making myself a BLT with an FGT and some goat cheese on top.  However, that might induce a gallbladder attack and I can’t have the surgeon laugh at me again when I tell him what I ate, so I will restrain myself.

Another fun green tomato idea is ice tomato pickles.  Ice tomato who?  Essentially green tomatoes that have been pickled and canned in a sweet syrup.  They are crunchy and sweet and you can enjoy them solo or on a sandwich.

I have fond memories of my grandfather arranging a weekend in the summer to prepare and can ice tomato pickles with my cousins.  Some how I got out of any responsibility associated with the task (thank goodness for being the youngest) and was free to just pop-in and check things out in between playing.  When I say that I got out of having any responsibility, I don’t mean to say that spending time with granddaddy was a chore, but canning and pickling (two things I hadn’t done myself until a few weekends ago) green tomatoes certainly was.  It is a laborious and time-intensive process to say the least.

I got together with three good girlfriends to do exactly what granddaddy did with my cousins – process these tomatoes.  We had 14lbs (thanks to Nancy and Susan) of green tomatoes.  Why so many?  Here in Colorado our summers aren’t as long and so you end up with a fair amount of tomatoes at the end of the season that don’t have a chance to turn (red) before our first snow.   14 lbs ended up producing 15 wide-mouthed pint jars.

The first day was devoted to washing and slicing the tomatoes, followed by soaking them for 24 hours in a lime solution.

Day 2 called for draining the lime solution and soaking the tomatoes for several more hours in fresh water.  After the fresh water soak, you must make a syrup in which the tomatoes sit over night.


Day 3 involves thickening the syrup and actually canning the tomatoes in the syrup.

And here is my finished product along side a can from my grandfather’s last batch before he left this world.  You can see that with time, they darken.  And, if you aren’t sure you’ll like ice tomato pickles and aren’t ready to commit to canning just yet, you can order some online.

Ice Tomato Pickles
7 lbs washed green tomatoes (slice 1/4 inch thick) – stems removed
3 cups of lime
2 gallons of water
4 lbs sugar
3 pints of white vinegar
1tsp of ground cloves
1 tsp of allspice
1 tsp of cinnamon
1 tsp of mace
1 tsp of celery seed
1 spice bag or cheesecloth bag

Soak the tomatoes in 2 gallons of lime water (3 cups of lime in 2 gallons) for 24 hours.  Drain and rinse the tomatoes and soak in fresh water for 4 hours.  Drain the tomatoes again.  In a pot, boil sugar, vinegar and spices (in the spice bag).  Once the syrup has come to a boil and the sugar is dissolved, pour over the tomatoes and let stand overnight.  In the morning, pour the syrup back into a pot for boiling, and boil it for an hour (this is just to boil out some of the water). Then add the pickles/tomatoes and bring to a boil.  Now can the tomatoes and syrup and you’re done!

Canning details could require an entire blog post.  In an effort not to “re-create the wheel” I will share a website with you that my friend Nancy shared with me.  It was quite helpful.  I would definitely do research on canning if it’s your first time.  If canning is not done properly, and the food has a chance to spoil it could be dangerous.  And one last suggestion: think through what time of day the waiting periods will fall.  You don’t want to be stuck canning in the middle of the night!

Read Full Post »

Jenny and I are approaching Sweet Pea and Punkin Seed’s first birthday.  After much deliberation, we (and by “we” I mean Jenny) thought of the perfect way to celebrate: we would bake ourselves a birthday cake – specifically, Mimi’s signature birthday cake. (See our earlier posts in the series called The Mimi Project.)

We talked about it in detail before Jenny and Dan arrived to Denver.  We pulled out Mimi’s recipe cards, and we even bought all of the ingredients.  But when we got down to it, we didn’t actually get to bake the cake together because – well, because life happens while you’re busy making plans.

You see, my dear sister and her hubby are moving out west – that’s right, I said west.  Alas, not to Denver, but to L.A.!  He has accepted an amazing new position, and she has accepted an amazing change.  And so, they cut their Denver trip short to swing over to L.A. and take care of potential domicile duties. With that said, this was nonetheless truly a shared effort.  Jenny bought the ingredients and even the cake pans, I baked the ingredients, and when she and Dan passed back through the Denver airport for their four-hour layover, I made sure Mom (who met them for lunch) had the finished product in tow so that they could indulge in a slice.

That first bite was just like I remembered at so many birthday parties.  Our family (and by family, I mean cousins, aunts, uncles, grandparents, family friends, pets, …ok, not pets, but you get the picture!) had a party for everyone’s birthday.  Does anyone wonder why I was a little round bowling ball with chicken legs as a child?  I’m talking about a birthday celebration club of 20 people – so imagine the amount and frequency of the eating we did.  As I’ve said we before, we are a family of live-to-eat-ers, not eat-to-live-ers.

Even more nostalgic than taking that first bite was the process of making the cake.  It brought back so many memories of us as children helping Mimi with the cake.  Sometimes, she would have the layers already done for us to help frost; sometimes, we got to help with the layers, in which case we were the official flour-sifters, wax-paper-cutters (we had to make the circles that fit in the bottom of each cake pan) and, of course, bowl-lickers.  The one part I’d forgotten was melting the chocolate over the stove.  I’m sure I don’t remember it because we were too short and too young, in Mimi’s estimation, to handle melting the stuff on a hot burner.

The part I remember with greatest fondness is the icing process – and boy, was it a process.  Seven-minute frosting (more romantically called “sea foam frosting” in one of Mimi’s cookbooks) is so named because you’ve got to stand with a hand-mixer over a double boiler for seven full minutes.  And if you can imagine my grandmother – whom I resemble in height, if nothing else, at 5’1” – with a metal 1950’s hand mixer, that’s no easy feat.  That thing was heavy.  Which is why Mimi would have to make sure that Granddaddy was around so that he could help hold the mixer.  Often they recruited a third helper, Cina – our beloved housekeeper and nanny (and the woman who is responsible for this blog almost being called “Bang Bang and Sweet Pea” – she always called me Bang Bang).  I always thought Mimi had trouble holding the hand mixer because she was aging, but after using my cheapo plastic hand-mixer from Target on Sunday, I can officially say – it’s hard.  Even I had to holler for Mike to step in and help me.


I also remember when the layers were baking that we weren’t allowed to open the oven for fear that the layers would fall (and sometimes they did anyhow).  Last Sunday I was channeling Mimi’s frustration when I made my second batch of layers, dealing with the joys of baking at altitude.  With that said, I will caution those here in the mountains that I have not tweaked this recipe to off-set the consequences we pay for living so high.  For those of you at sea level, this recipe is spot on – just don’t open your oven doors!

Jenny and I both concur that this cake is not like the grocery cakes that are overwhelmingly sweet and moist.  It’s a little drier and a more complex flavor than just pure sweetness.  It’s a Devil’s Food Cake, which is a recipe based on brown sugar.  This brown-ness comes from a coating of molasses and is the thing to which I attribute the unique taste and texture of this cake.

Wikipedia says that it's common for Devil Food Cake to have coffee in it. This recipe does not have coffee - however, it does have unsweetened chocolate.

But what really (I mean really) makes this cake is the icing, which is also made with brown sugar.  This frosting is almost meringue-like in consistency when it cools and dries, which means that this cake is best enjoyed after it’s had a few hours to rest.

With age, Mimi had us re-write some of her recipe cards. Hence, Jenny's handwriting.

Don’t be tempted to slice and enjoy right away – frost it and leave it.  Soak your aching mixer-holding arm in a hot bath.  Think about who you’ll be inviting over to enjoy this old-fashioned delight.  And wait for the icing to darken and harden just slightly before you sink in your cake knife and create new memories with just the right hint of sticky sweetness.

(Note: the photo below is of the cake freshly iced – I only learned after the fact, how much difference waiting has on the look and texture of the cake.)

This is freshly iced; the icing hasn't hardened yet in the photo


Mimi’s Devil’s Food Cake

1/2 cup (1 stick) of unsalted butter
2 cups of light brown sugar
2 eggs
2 1/4 cup of sifted cake flour
1/4 tsp of salt
1/2 cup of “sour” milk aka buttermilk
1/2 cup of water (in a pot for boiling)
1 tsp if baking soda
1 1/2 squares of unsweetened chocolate (could substitute cocoa powder)
1 tsp ofvanilla
1 tsp of baking powder

Before starting the batter making process, line the bottom of 3 – 7 or 8 inch round cake pans with wax paper.  Rub butter or shortening on the wax paper and on the sides of the pan.  Slightly toss a very small amount of flour in each pan to coat the greased sides and bottom.  Now your cake pans are ready to receive the batter.  Pre-heat your oven to 325 degrees.

Cream the shortening aka, butter, add 1 cup of the sugar, and cream some more.  In a separate bowl, beat the eggs lightly, and the 2nd cup of sugar.  Add the egg/sugar mixture to the butter/sugar mixture, and cream.  In a separate bowl sift flour until you can measure out 2 1/4 cups.   Then add the baking powder and re-sift.  Alternate adding the flour mixture and the buttermilk to the egg mixture.  Bring the pot of water to a boil, and add the chocolate squares until melted.  Add the baking soda.  Add vanilla, and slowly temper the egg mixture with the melted chocolate mixture.

Pour batter evenly into the 3 lined cake pans.  Mimi used a scale to weigh each pan so that the layers would cook at exactly the same rate.  Bake the layers for about 25 minutes or until done at 325 degrees.  Don’t open your ovens until you are done baking!  Just use your oven window to judge the readiness of the layers.  Let the layers cool enough to remove from the cake pans.  Let rest on a cooling surface until room temperature to ice the cake.

Doubly-Boiler Sea Foam Frosting

2 egg whites, unbeaten
1 1/2 cup of brown sugar firmly packed
5 tbsp of water
1 tsp of vanilla extract
dash of salt

Combine egg whites, sugar, water and salt in the top of a double boiler, beating with a hand-mixer until thoroughly mixed.  Continue beating while cooking for 7 minutes or until icing stands in a peak on the beater.  Remove from water, add vanilla, and beat until thick enough to spread.

Assembling the cake

Ice the bottom layer on top and edges.  Add 2nd layer and repeat.  Add 3rd layer an repeat.  Mimi always inserted toothpicks into the cake layers to keep them from slipping (she was often traveling to someone’s house with the cake).  Sometimes Mimi would shave Heathbar shavings on top as well. Remember, let the cake sit for a day before you eat it.  Mimi always stored it in Rubbermaid, air tight cake cake keeper.

Read Full Post »

When Rachael and I started The Mimi Project, we compiled a list of recipes – with the help of other family members – that we wanted to re-create.  Mimi died at Christmas last year, and Rachael and I inherited her treasured recipe box.  Every time I talked to Mimi in the months before her death, she told us that she was busy getting the recipes cards organized for us, a fact our Aunt Mary Anne confirmed.  Mimi spent hours at the dining room table, combing through those cards, ostensibly trying to get them in some kind of order.  I think the exercise might have been more about reminiscing, thinking about all the good things she had cooked and all the things she would still like to cook.  Lord knows, she cooked until the end!  After reading Rachael’s post about failed ice-box cookies, Mimi baked us a batch – they were fresh and waiting for us on Christmas morning just days after her death.

Thinking of Mimi lovingly mixing and forming and baking cookies for us even as she was dying, it’s clear to me why I feel such a connection between food, love, and family.  I was touched, then, to discover a recipe attributed to my brother Michele as I sorted through Mimi’s cards.  Rachael, Michele, and I share the same mom (and thus the same Mimi!) – but Michele’s dad is not ours.  Michele’s dad Maurizio is Italian, from Florence, but I’ve had the pleasure of knowing him my whole life as he now lives in Tallahassee, Florida.  He is a sweet man, an accomplished scholar/designer (he’s been working on the Large Hadron Collider!) and a wonderful cook.  I remember distinctly finding a jar of Barilla pasta sauce in my mom’s fridge many years ago – it was a new brand to our area back then, and I wanted to try it.  It was delicious – just like home-made – and I excitedly bought another jar on my next trip to the grocery store.  Imagine my disappointment when I opened that jar to discover the flavorless, processed stuff that I should have expected – and I realized immediately that the jar I’d found in my mom’s fridge had been a gift from Maurizio, homemade marinara sauce re-packaged in a recycled jar.

Michele’s sauce-making abilities rival those of his dad, so when I found this marinara sauce attributed to Michele among Mimi’s recipes, I knew immediately I had to make it.  I found the perfect use for the sauce when I came across another of Mimi’s recipes, for “zucchini lasagna.”  It wasn’t until I was in the middle of cooking the zucchini lasagna that I realized that there are no lasagna noodles – the whole point is to replace the pasta with vegetables.  It’s simple, surprisingly good, and a great use for all those squash and zucchini at the farmer’s markets right now.  And of course, for me, it’s a casserole that represents the layers of love and family that I connect to through cooking.

Michele's Tomato Sauce

Michele’s Tomato (Marinara) Sauce

1 large can whole peeled tomatoes (I like organic San Marzanos, like these)
2/3 tbsp olive oil
Half an onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 tbsp sugar
Cayenne
Salt and pepper

In a medium sauce pan over medium heat, saute the onions and garlic in olive oil until soft and translucent.  Do not let the onions or garlic get browned or crisp.  Add the tomatoes, sugar, a dash of cayenne, and salt and pepper to taste.  Crush the tomatoes with a wooden spoon and cook over low-medium heat until the tomatoes are broken down and flavors are melded, at least 30 minutes.  Taste for salt, adjust as needed, and serve.

Mimi’s Zucchini Lasagna
Serves 6-8

1/2 pound ground beef
1/2 c. chopped onion
1 15 oz. can of tomato sauce (or equivalent homemade – which is preferred!)
4 medium zucchini (about 1 1/4 pounds), sliced into rounds – I used a combination of zucchini and summer squash
2 tbsp. flour, divided
1 (12 oz.) container of cottage cheese
1 egg, beaten
1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
Olive oil
Salt and pepper

Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees.

In a large saute pan, cook onion in olive oil over medium heat until translucent.  Add ground beef, browning and stirring to crumble.  Add tomato sauce, taste for salt and pepper and adjust seasoning as needed.  Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer uncovered for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.  Set cooked ground beef and tomato sauce aside.

In a large saute pan over medium heat, saute zucchini – I used a non-stick skillet and basically no olive oil.  The squash and zucchini cooked nicely and even browned a little bit.

Spray a 12″ x 8″ x 2″ baking dish with non-stick cooking spray or olive oil in a mister.  Combine cottage cheese and egg.  Start with a layer of zucchini on the bottom of the pan.  Then sprinkle with 1 tbsp of the flour.  Spread a layer of the cottage cheese mixture, then spoon half of the meat sauce over the cottage cheese.  Repeat layers.  Bake casserole at 375 degrees for 35 minutes (until hot and bubbling).  Sprinkle with mozzarella cheese and bake another 5 minutes, until cheese begins to brown.  Let the casserole rest for 5 minutes before serving.  I garnished it with a chiffonade of basil – but it’s wonderful on its own, too!

Read Full Post »

My little garden is really starting to produce: my first cherry tomatoes have ripened, the first large green tomatoes are ready to ripen, we’ve enjoyed many wonderful leaf lettuce salads, and now the cucumbers are going crazy.

Mimi and Granddaddy always had a big garden when I was growing up.  In the summertime, they grew sweet and hot peppers, tomatoes, eggplant, onions, potatoes, cucumbers, summer squash, zucchini, scallions, and green beans, at a minimum.   I remember helping them sometimes, mostly with the harvesting: crouching along the rows of green beans, making sure to get all the little pods.  Or helping Granddaddy in the winter, washing his harvests of collard, mustard, and turnips greens in successive water baths in big white buckets in the carport (don’t you know, there were no “garages” back then – just carports!).   Somehow, though, I escaped most of the labor involved in their garden and simply got to enjoy the fruits: those greens, cleaned, cooked, and doused with Granddaddy’s home-grown and -made pepper vinegar; soft, cooked green beans with onions and ham hocks in the summer and crisp canned green bean salad with tangy dressing and sharp onions in the winter; steaming hot cornbread sticks – like the ones Rachael made here – slathered in Mimi’s home-made and -grown pepper jelly; Mimi’s ratatouille, surely inspired by Julia Child’s introduction of French cooking to America’s home cooks, composed of stewed eggplant, peppers, and tomatoes.

More than anything, though, summer at Mimi and Granddaddy’s house meant dinners full of crisp, beautiful, home-grown cucumbers – very often, cucumbers simply peeled, sliced, and bathed in white vinegar, topped with ice cubes and chilled in the refrigerator.  Crunchy, light, tangy, and cool, biting into these helped combat the sweltering blanket of heat that covers North Florida in the summertime.

Iced cucumber salad

My one cucumber plant is producing about one or two cucumbers a day right now – that’s upwards of a dozen a week, and I don’t pick them until they’re pretty big (the ones pictured above are actually from the farmer’s market, before mine were ready to harvest – much smaller than what I’ve been picking at home).  We have a lot of cucumbers to eat!  Mimi canned many of hers, of course, making a couple of kinds of cucumber pickles, in addition to her green tomato pickles, canned green beans, jellies, relishes, and frozen home-grown fruits and veggies.  But I wondered what other fresh preparations of cucumbers she made, so I turned to the pile of hand-written recipe cards I brought home after her funeral last Christmas.  Of course, Mimi didn’t disappoint.

“Buttermilk Salad” was the answer I came away with.  I don’t remember ever eating this growing up, but that could be because I turned my nose up at it.  I thought I hated buttermilk, one of those decisions you make as a child and don’t question until you’re old enough to have forgotten why you thought you hated that thing in the first place.  I don’t think I could drink a tall glass of buttermilk with dinner, like my mom is apt to do, but sliced fresh cucumbers drenched in the creamy, tangy stuff?  I’m there.

Mimi’s Sliced Cucumber Salad with Vinegar

Cucumbers, peeled and thinly sliced
White Vinegar, enough to cover sliced cukes
Sliced sweet white onion (preferably Vidalia)
Salt & pepper
Ice cubes

Peel and slice as many cucumbers as you’d like and place in a bowl.  Add sliced white onion, season with salt and pepper to taste, and mix.  Cover with white vinegar – if you want the salad to be a little milder and less vinegary, replace some portion of the vinegar with water.  Top with ice cubes and place in refrigerator to chill before eating.  This is best made an hour or less before you plan to eat, so that the cucumbers are at their freshest.

Mimi’s Buttermilk Salad
Serves 6

3 medium cucumbers
1 small clove garlic
1/2 tsp. thyme (I used fresh lemon thyme)
Salt
1 quart buttermilk
Optional: thin slices of sweet white onion

Peel and slice cucumbers as finely as possible.  Put the garlic through press and add with thyme to the cucumber.  Add onion if you’re going to use it – only use a small amount and slice very thinly.  Mix thoroughly with the cold, fresh buttermilk and season to taste with salt.  Serve immediately or chill for an hour and serve.

Read Full Post »

A couple of Sundays ago I visited a dear friend.  She’s special to me for many reasons – the first of which was quite obvious at the outset: we both love food.  And what makes her even more special? She’s a Southern girl!  At any rate, on Sunday we celebrated her latest achievement in life – pregnancy!  I made her some simply delicious and comforting cornbread sticks (I think baby was happy).  Folks, this recipe is not for the faint hearted (or for vegetarians for that matter).  This is not the sweet “cornbread” that Boston Market (or something of the sort) serves.  Rather, these are Mimi’s cornbread sticks, also known as authentic cornbread.  Simple, savory, and sacred.

Recipe
1 cup of white water ground corn meal
1 teaspoon of baking powder
1/2 teaspoon of salt
3/8 teaspoon of baking soda
2 Tablespoons of fat (bacon fat!!!)
1 Cup of Buttermilk
1 Egg 

Instructions:

I preface these instructions with the statement that you can use either use cast-iron corn bread pans or a cast-iron skillet.  I personally love making them in my cornbread stick pans just like Mimi did (thanks to my love for the pans).  You can make a slit right down the middle of the long stick which is perfect for inserting the condiment of your choice (butter for some, but for me it’s homemade hot pepper jelly).  But either type of pan is fine!

Preheat your oven at 425 with the cast-iron skillet (be it corn bread pans, or skillet) in the over.  Meanwhile, mix the dry ingredients.

Then add the buttermilk and egg and mix – but don’t over mix.  It’s OK if the mixture has a few clumps.  Once the pans are HOT, pull them out of the oven and pour a half of a spoonful of hot bacon grease in the pan and spread around.  Spoon the batter into hot greased pan.  In fact, it should be hot enough that you hear the batter sizzle in the pan as if its frying in the bacon grease.  Then put the pan (s) in the oven to cook for 10-15 minutes.  The bread tends to cook fast on the bottom.  If you feel like it’s not quite done, but getting too dark on the bottom, you can flip it over.  This recipe should fill two corn bread stick pans, or one skillet.  Remember, these are not supposed to taste sweet.  They are very plain and very delicious!

Cooked bacon, in order to use bacon grease

Dry ingredients

Dry and wet ingredients

Raw batter in HOT pan, greased with bacon grease

Baked cornbread sticks still in the hot pan

Cooked cornbread sticks

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »